Oleg Kozlovsky’s English Weblog

Politics, Democracy and Human Rights in Russia

Vaclav Havel Speaks in Support of Solidarity

with 8 comments

Written by Oleg Kozlovsky

February 19, 2009 at 08:30

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,

8 Responses

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  1. Thank you for including both Russian and English subtitles.

    annonymous

    February 19, 2009 at 18:32

  2. Oleg, do you think Solidarity will be more effective than past attempts to unify the factured opposition forces behind a single flag?

    larussophobe

    February 21, 2009 at 04:18

  3. I can only hope. Of course, there are certain problems even within Solidarity: former political rivals have to learn to work together, which isn’t an easy task. But I believe that the opposition will never achieve its goals without gaining such an ability. Time will tell, of course.

    Oleg Kozlovsky

    February 21, 2009 at 10:14

  4. It seems necessary not only that these political rivals work together, but that they open their table to those who have new ideas and have not yet been involved in the halls of power or as candidates, like Nemtsov and Kasparov. After all, their traditional ideas so far have led to nothing but some interesting newspaper articles. Do you feel that they are open to such new ideas and new leaders?

    larussophobe

    February 22, 2009 at 14:54

  5. Keep on dreaming guys,there is not a snowballs chance in hell these bloodsuckers are going to take over Russia.
    There is the conservative Party of Prime Minister Putin and there is the social democratic party,communists and Zhirinovsky,that means Russian polic is institucionalized and will stay course…
    In my view Kasparow “Weinstein”should be stripped of his Russian citizenship,this kikie is member of a US neocon organization and can be considered a traitor like Nemtsov,all of them so desperate because they came too late in the 90s to become oligarchs…

    Dan

    February 22, 2009 at 19:11

  6. LR, there are problems, of course. It’s hard to expect the old leaders to quietly walk away, especially in Russia, where no such tradition exists. But this process is taking place and will, I think, eventually lead to rise of a new generation of leaders of the democratic movement.

    Dan, I have no idea what country you are writing about, but it’s certainly not Russia.

    Oleg Kozlovsky

    February 22, 2009 at 20:28

  7. Oleg, I have a few serious questions for you. While you and your organization Oborona claim to stand for true democracy in Russia, and uphold yourselves as the only hope then why is it from reading your articles that I see no condemnation of the rape of Chechnya? No call for the defeat of Russian forces, or for Chechnya’s independence from Russia?

    Unless I’m wrong, Oborona is part of or at least cooperates with the “Other Russia” opposition. Yet this opposition consists of Stalinists, nationalists, fascists (Limonov), and pro-western liberals; all of whom enjoy in their own way upholding Russian chauvinism. By your image you desire a “color revolution” in Russia, yet the all the others (Serbia, Ukraine, Georgia, Kyrgyzstan) have only replaced one corrupt nationalist robber baron with another, leaving in place the same system. So that being the case we come to my bonus question: In what ways could you possibly create a better society different from Putin? I have my ideas, but I’d very much like your answers.

    Peace

    Tower Bolshevik

    February 23, 2009 at 14:11

  8. thank you very much
    regards

    kadir inanır

    February 25, 2009 at 04:08


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